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in november. and as someone who participated in the inaugural for president obama four years ago and we had absolutely no idea what we were doing, i can tell you that the folks at the jsic regardless of who the chair is and the folks at jtf are there ready for you when you walk in the door and really do a lot of the logistical lift on this. it's really more our job just to make sure the president ice kind of imprint is put on some of these events. one of the ways we do that is in the parade, as the colonel mentioned, along with all these military elements there are 58 different groups, 58 different groups, floats and vehicles. these are from all 50 states. they are everything from the virginia military institute just across the river in virginia down in southern virginia which has marched in a number of inaugural parades all the way through a group, one of my favorites, a group from maine of unicyclists that will be joining us. i believe they are called -- let me get the name right -- the jim dandies, the jim, of course, being spelled g-y-m in this case. the president will stand and watch t
a election in this country. whether any technology lessons to be drawn from this years election? >> it's always hard to reason from one event. the winners get to write history and the losers think about the next election. there's no question the obama campaign, had a technology strategy that helped elect the president. they had little processors and targeted programs and send out the vote. to me the way to say this is governments are going to change, too. because on the one hand governments have an awful time delivering services. now we can measure the. if someone as you give me some money to donate rice to the following village, we cannot check whether the rice got there. a check and balance on sort of the corruption. and we can test the effectiveness of programs. to give you some of the more worrisome examples, governments can know where people really are and governments can figure out where people report what they're doing versus what they're actually doing. there are all sorts of worrisome scenarios that you can imagine, the slippery slope. i'll pick one in britain. in london when
the obama administration there's actually been great leaps forward in terms of transactional use of the internet. people file their taxes online. this goes off year after year with relatively to problems. you know -- no problems. you know, this has actually been, those two things have been good advantages. i think the major failing over the last 20 years, and it really goes even back beyond that, is that because we were in a sort of anti-government mode for much of that time and we had at least until the last election a very ascendant conservative feeling in the country, we started to do government not through government. and i think what my two colleagues here are reflecting is that we began to implement policy through regulation and through the tax system. as opposed to taking on policy head on. so your example, phil, about the congo, okay? look, clearly that place is a mess. clearly -- >> uh-huh. no argument. [laughter] >> every good intention people in the congress wanted to make a stance. but doing it that way? as opposed through a more direct, straight-on, diplomatic endeav
on public roles one indeed for all the controversy over president obama's of care mandate that got so much attention in june of last year the founding fathers and 1792 passed a law requiring every free citizenry between the age of 18 to 45 to output themselves with a rifle with capable of serving in the militia. as of the founding fathers didn't view the second amendment as a basis for insurrection. rather they viewed it as part of a well regulated militia in the. >> i was wondering if you could talk a little bit about why whether in the publication you might be able to stratify or break out when likely voters just thinking about polls that policymakers are going to be paying attention to whether that is one way and then also with the voters by state or region in the country. >> that is a good question as we know often in the context of the election polling survey research firms have proprietary algorithms and usually four, five, six questions that allow them to break out likely voters to read our goal and motivation for this research is something different. for this purpose we care about
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4